Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos is Donating $100 Million to Feeding America For Coronavirus Relief

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos is Donating $100 Million to Feeding America For Coronavirus Relief


There have been many moves to make sure people don’t go hungry through this coronavirus crisis. Amazon‘s Jeff Bezos is just the latest to contribute to the cause. The Amazon CEO posted on his Instagram account, the efforts of his funds being donated to Feeding America, a Chicago-based nonprofit with more than 200 food banks across the United States.

“Even in ordinary times, food insecurity in American households is an important problem, and unfortunately COVID-19 is amplifying that stress significantly. Non-profit food banks and food pantries rely in large part on surplus food from a range of food businesses. For example, many restaurants donate excess food. But during this time of social distancing, restaurants are closed, and many other normal channels of excess food have also shut down. To make matters worse, as supply is dwindling, demand for food bank services is going up.⁣

“Today, I want to support those on the front lines at our nation’s food banks and those who are relying on them for food with a $100 million gift to @FeedingAmerica. Feeding America will quickly distribute the funds to their national network of food banks and food pantries, getting food to those countless families who need it.⁣

“Feeding America is the largest non-profit focused on food security. Millions of Americans are turning to food banks during this time. If you want to help, the link to Feeding America is in my bio. They’d be excited and grateful for donations of any size.”

Feeding America will distribute the funds to its national network of food banks and food pantries, helping those in need.

 

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Even in ordinary times, food insecurity in American households is an important problem, and unfortunately COVID-19 is amplifying that stress significantly. Non-profit food banks and food pantries rely in large part on surplus food from a range of food businesses. For example, many restaurants donate excess food. But during this time of social distancing, restaurants are closed, and many other normal channels of excess food have also shut down. To make matters worse, as supply is dwindling, demand for food bank services is going up.⁣ ⁣ Today, I want to support those on the front lines at our nation’s food banks and those who are relying on them for food with a $100 million gift to @FeedingAmerica. Feeding America will quickly distribute the funds to their national network of food banks and food pantries, getting food to those countless families who need it.⁣ ⁣ Feeding America is the largest non-profit focused on food security. Millions of Americans are turning to food banks during this time. If you want to help, the link to Feeding America is in my bio. They’d be excited and grateful for donations of any size.

A post shared by Jeff Bezos (@jeffbezos) on

 






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Telecommuting Shows Its Advantages During Coronavirus Outbreak

Telecommuting Shows Its Advantages During Coronavirus Outbreak


The coronavirus outbreak is currently changing every aspect of life, however, work is continuing for many at home and its advantages are showing.

Everything from job interviews to daytime and late-night television shows has changed in recent weeks. However, telecommuting is showing that with widespread implementation, it could provide significant advantages.

According to Fast Company, the coronavirus is showing governments and countries that working from home can be the new standard.

“Coronavirus is going to expose more people to working remotely than ever,” said Greg Caplan, CEO of Remote Year, a company that helps businesses with working remotely. “Most people will see that it is very possible and start to grow accustomed to the benefits of [remote work], including autonomy, no commute, and less distractions than open offices. Companies that don’t allow remote work already are going to have to continue supporting it going forward, now that they have proven to themselves that it works.”

Some believe that telecommuting forces people to stay more connected to the teams and people they work with.

“Our individuals and managers make more conscious efforts to clarify roles, expectations, and to discuss progress with remote employees,” said Shanna Tellerman CEO of Modsy, an E-interior design company. “Our remote employees rank 5% higher than office employees when asked if they know what is expected of them at work. They also rank 5% above office employees when asked if they have had discussions with their managers about progress in the past six months.”

Many remote workers thrive on routine and discipline and as a result, will often complete work assignments faster than if they were in-office. Madeline Kelley, a global enterprise sales manager, told Fast Company she’s far more productive and effective as a remote worker “Because no one is around to hold you accountable, you have to be accountable for yourself.”

“I spend most of my days in my apartment—with my two dogs—on sales calls, replying to emails, and having internal video meetings. And I always manage to get everything done.” Kelley added.

Another advantage of telecommuting is the cost. Businesses across the world pay thousands in rent for office space. Meanwhile, mass transit or gas and food costs are just a few of the daily expenses for employees. Being able to save on office space is a great way for companies to save money while paying their workers more at the same time.

“Most companies spend 10 to 15% of revenue on rent. We use that savings to pay our employees above-market wages,” said Chris Neumann, who started his company, Cro Metrics, with a remote workforce in 2011. “We are providing really great jobs that team members would otherwise not have access to, and in return, we are able to attract the best talent from around the country.”

While the news is good for those who can work from home, for African Americans, the chances of working from home are lower than most races. Making things worse, is that low-wage workers are putting themselves at a greater risk for contracting the virus.





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Tiger Tests Positive for COVID-19 at The Bronx Zoo in New York City

Tiger Tests Positive for COVID-19 at The Bronx Zoo in New York City


The spread of the coronavirus has reached so far that, according to the Wildlife Conservation Society’s Bronx Zoo, a tiger was tested and received a positive test result for COVID-19 at a New York City Zoo.

The Malayan tiger, who is named Nadia, is believed to be the first known case of an animal being infected with COVID-19 in the United States. It is believed that Nadia and six other big cats were infected by an asymptomatic zookeeper at New York City’s Bronx Zoo. The test result was confirmed by the USDA’s National Veterinary Services Laboratory in Iowa.

Nadia, a 4-year-old female tiger, along with her sister, Azul, two Amur tigers, and three African lions developed a dry cough and all are expected to recover.

In a written statement from the Wildlife Conservation Society, “We tested the cat out of an abundance of caution and will ensure any knowledge we gain about COVID-19 will contribute to the world’s continuing understanding of this novel coronavirus.

“Though they have experienced some decrease in appetite, the cats at the Bronx Zoo are otherwise doing well under veterinary care and are bright, alert, and interactive with their keepers. It is not known how this disease will develop in big cats since different species can react differently to novel infections, but we will continue to monitor them closely and anticipate full recoveries.”

It’s also been reported that none of the zoo’s other cats, including snow leopards, cheetahs, clouded leopard, Amur leopard, puma or serval are showing any signs of being infected by the COVID-19 illness. Appropriate preventive measures have been put in place for all remaining staff who are caring for the animals and the other cats in four Wildlife Conservation Society zoos in order to prevent further exposure of any other of our zoo cats.





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Earl Graves Sr., Founder of Black Enterprise And Ultimate Champion of Black Business, Passes Away At 85

Earl Graves Sr., Founder of Black Enterprise And Ultimate Champion of Black Business, Passes Away At 85


Black Enterprise Founder and Publisher Earl G. Graves, Sr., the quintessential entrepreneur who created a vehicle of information and advocacy that has inspired four generations of African Americans to build wealth through entrepreneurship, career advancement and money management, has died. According to his son, Black Enterprise CEO Earl “Butch” Graves Jr., he passed away quietly at 9:22 p.m. on April 6, after a long battle with Alzheimer’s. Graves was 85.

Graves was widely considered to be the ultimate champion of black business, launching Black Enterprise in 1970 to not only chronicle the rise of African American entrepreneurs, but also provide the tools for African Americans to succeed in the business mainstream and  “achieve their measure of the American dream.”

In his award-winning, now classic, business bestseller, How To Succeed In Business Without Being White, Graves stated his life-defining purpose for founding Black Enterprise in simple, direct terms: “The time was ripe for a magazine devoted to economic development in the African American community. The publication was committed to the task of educating, inspiring and uplifting its readers. My goal was to show them how to thrive professionally, economically and as proactive, empowered citizens.”

Driven by that mission, Graves became a trailblazing entrepreneur in his own right, building Black Enterprise from a single-magazine publishing company 50 years ago, to a diversified multimedia business spreading the message of financial empowerment to more than 6 million African Americans through print, digital, broadcast and live-event platforms.  As such, Black Enterprise was one of two companies that would appear on the BE 100s—the publication’s annual rankings of the nation’s largest black-owned businesses—each of its 47 years. At one point, Graves would operate two companies on the list, including Pepsi-Cola of Washington, DC, one of the nation’s largest soft-drink distributors owned by African Americans.

Graves’ influence and reach also extended into the mainstream of corporate America. One of the few African Americans to serve on the boards of major corporations such as American Airlines, Daimler Chrysler, Rohm & Hass and Federated Department Stores (Macy’s), he was a staunch advocate for African American inclusion in the C-Suite and corporate governance. Graves was also a tireless champion of major corporations doing business with black-owned companies.

Beyond business, Graves was a force in politics, civil rights and philanthropy. In fact, he played a pivotal role in galvanizing support for the election of the first African American president of the United States, Barack Obama, through his endorsement in Black Enterprise and service as a surrogate campaigning on his behalf. Before that, Graves also championed the historic presidential bids of Rev. Jesse Jackson. Moreover, his fight for racial justice and economic parity earned him the NAACP Spingarn Medal, the organization’s highest honor, in 1999.

Graves was also known for his dedication to family, and especially to his wife Barbara Kydd Graves, who passed away in 2012. Together, they raised three sons, Earl Jr., Johnny and Michael, and were blessed with eight grandchildren.

Born in 1935, Graves reaches the pinnacle of power from humble beginnings in the Bedford Stuyvesant section of Brooklyn, New York. It was in that community where he learned the lessons of hard work and perseverance from his parents, Earl Godwin and Winifred Sealy Graves. After graduating from a Morgan State University with a B.A. in economics, he served two years as an officer in the Army, and held jobs in law enforcement and real estate. In 1975, he joined the staff of U.S. Senator Robert F. Kennedy as his administrative assistant. When Kennedy was assassinated in 1968, he decided to start a publication that would provide blacks with the pathway to go into entrepreneurship.

He wrote: “Black Enterprise was just a modest magazine when I founded it—just me, a few brave advertisers like Pepsi, ExxonMobil  and General Motors; and a small but spirited staff. And one other person who did just about everything there is to do to put out a magazine—my wife, Barbara.”

The young publisher managed to gain a $250,000 loan from Chase Manhattan Bank and proved so masterful at selling and running the magazine that it became profitable in 10 months — enabling Graves to repay the loan to the major financial institution.

With his wife Barbara at his side, he grew the magazine into one of the nation’s most successful and respected. The world first discovered such business luminaries as Oprah Winfrey, former American Express CEO Kenneth Chenault, billionaire dealmaker Bob Johnson and the late financier Reginald F.  Lewis on the pages of Black Enterprise. In fact, Robert Smith. the billionaire CEO of Vista Equity Partners, like so many successful black entrepreneurs and corporate leaders, admitted that he switched careers to high finance after reading Black Enterprise.

“The truth of the matter is that we are humbled by the achievements of the talented people we report on,” Graves wrote. “We are in awe, still, by the courage it takes to put oneself on the line in an unmerciful marketplace.”

Hundreds of thousands express awe and gratitude for the role he played and example of excellence and achievement he set for generations to come.





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Bubba Wallace Loses Sponsorship After “Rage-Quitting” NASCAR iRacing Event

Bubba Wallace Loses Sponsorship After “Rage-Quitting” NASCAR iRacing Event


Professional NASCAR driver Bubba Wallace lost his sponsorship for a virtual racing series after getting upset and quitting the event following a crash Sunday.

With the coronavirus outbreak suspending real NASCAR races, some drivers are trying to keep fans engaged and entertained through virtual means. One method has been the eNASCAR iRacing Pro Invitational Series, a set of races featuring NASCAR drivers racing one another in a video game simulation.

According to Fox Sports, Wallace was one of the 32 drivers competing in the Food City Showdown at a virtual Bristol Motor Speedway on Sunday. Wallace crashed on the 11th lap of the 150 lap race when Clint Bowyer cut in front of Wallace’s car on a straightaway, then came up high and put Wallace into the wall. Wallace was so upset that he wound up rage-quitting, a popular gamer term for a player who gets so angry that they prematurely bow out of the competition. Wallace quit almost immediately after the crash.

“Y’all have a good one. That’s it. This is why I don’t take this [expletive] serious,” Wallace said on his Twitch stream immediately after the wreck. “Peace out!”

Wallace was given a DQ/DNF in the virtual race but he also received some real-life backlash. One of the driver’s sponsors, joint/muscle cream Blue-Emu didn’t take too kindly to his flippant attitude and decided to pull their sponsorship. Things could get worse for the driver. The company is a sponsor of Wallace’s real-life racing team and just recently signed a multi-year contract to become an official partner of NASCAR. Meaning the company will be in the space even after the pandemic passes and actual races resume.

The coronavirus outbreak has led to many athletes and teams giving back while their sports are postponed. Former New York Knicks guard Stephon Marbury is working with a Chinese manufacturer to deliver 10  million masks to New York City. Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban was the first owner of a major sports franchise to say that arena staff will continue to be paid through the outbreak.






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Tyler Perry Gives $500 Tips To Out-Of-Work Servers At Atlanta Restaurant

Tyler Perry Gives $500 Tips To Out-Of-Work Servers At Atlanta Restaurant


The outbreak of COVID-19, otherwise known as the coronavirus, has created seismic changes across the country and the economic downfall has been severe. Over 3 million people filed for unemployment within the first week after the stimulus package was passed with over 700,000 jobs being lost as a result. The restaurant industry is one of the niche sectors that is struggling to stay alive under the mandatory stay-at-home order issued in many states. Entertainment mogul Tyler Perry is the latest to offer his help and support to those impacted by COVID-19.

Perry made a group of restaurant servers’ days a little brighter with a generous gift. While picking up an order from one of his favorite chain restaurants, Houston’s, over the weekend, he showed his appreciation to the staff by offering a $21,000 tip, $500 for each of the 42 servers working at the establishment. At a time when stimulus checks aren’t expected to come for several weeks, or longer, this charitable act was deeply appreciated by the staff.

Perry is known for his acts of kindness over the years, helping people in need and participating in many philanthropic activities. In 2010, he helped to rebuild an 88-year-old woman’s home that was destroyed in a fire in Atlanta. In 2018, Perry paid off the balances of everything that was on layaway at two Atlanta-area Walmart stores during Christmas.

He recently started the #HesGotTheWholeWorldChallenge on Instagram, inviting other celebrities to join and help uplift people’s spirits during a difficult time.






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